Treating Acne: Oral medications, Chemical Peels, Non-Invasive Lasers

Concerned young woman squeezing acne

What do Cameron Diaz, Brad Pitt and Alicia Keys all have in common? Well, besides being worth millions, they all struggle with acne. Acne doesn’t discriminate, it affects men and women of all races and a large range of ages.

It’s not just an esthetic inconvenience, it’s a skin disease. Over the years there have been many different viewpoints on what causes it, how to stop new breakouts from developing and how to treat scarring from acne. The current trends in non-invasive, but effective esthetic treatments are a breath of fresh air to current acne sufferers.

Whether you’re a teenager or middle aged, the top three non-invasive treatments are chemical peels, lasers and prescription creams combined with oral medication. Everyone’s body responds differently, so a combination of treatment options are typically combined for best results.

Oral medications are often a first step in treating acne. Often combined with chemical peels, lasers and topical prescription creams, medications can combat internal causes of acne. The most popular oral medications for acne are clinda-/doxy-/tetra-cyclines, low dose birth control pills and Accutane, an oral retinoid.

Chemical peels are a great treatment for acne because they help to break up dead skin cells that can often accompany prescription topical creams, kill bacteria that forms breakouts and improve discoloration from past acne scars. Depending upon the type of chemical peel, there may be a few days to weeks of flaking and peeling.

Non-invasive lasers, such as Fraxel, work by creating small injuries deep within skin layers. Once the skin notices that the cells are damaged, it works to rebuild new layers of skin which will improve discoloration from past breakouts as well as light pocking in the skin.

Decades ago there was not much hope for acne sufferers, but in 2016 the possibilities are endless. If you are struggling with acne and looking for help, consider applying for our current clinical study. You can reach us at (954) 626-3743.

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